We work with cultural producers and providers. But we never forget that, in the long run, we work for cultural consumers, participants, and communities.

We bring a healthy skepticism about the assumptions that have long shaped practice in the arts, museums, science communication, public media, and other corners of culture. What got you here won’t get you where you need to go next. That’s why we’ve earned a reputation for helping forward-looking practitioners challenge and update those assumptions through clear-eyed research and evaluation.

Our Mission

To help the cultural sector, broadly defined, understand its participants and communities, experiment with new strategies for engagement, and connect more deeply to more—and more diverse—people.

Our Vision

A world where culture belongs to everyone, inclusively and equitably. Where relevance is built in partnership with communities and audiences. And where social research & evaluation open a conversation between institutions and audiences about new possibilities.

Our Values

Curiosity.

This is what fuels our research—a hunger to learn more and a humility about what we think we’ve already learned. Inquiry is a journey, not a spot on the map.

Collaboration.

We’re all about thought-partnership, both with each other at the firm and with our clients and colleagues around the field. We’re all in this together.

Equity, diversity, and inclusion.

Because culture is stronger and more creative in itself and a more powerful tool for social change when it welcomes difference and diversity. And we’re a stronger firm when we do the same.

Rigor and integrity.

As researchers, our job is to provide an independent, empirical view: methodologically rigorous, critical when necessary, and candidly conveyed. (If that’s not your cup of tea, we’re not the right firm.)

Co-creation with communities.

We see research and evaluation as paving stones on the two-way street of engagement. We use co-creative techniques to not just understand audiences and communities but also empower them and tap their creativity and vision.

Field-building and sharing.

Whenever possible, we share—and encourage our clients to share—research findings and strategic lessons with the wider field. And we do mean “wider”: our broad definition of culture means that learning cross-pollinates from one community-of-practice to another.

These are not just data-points in a graph, they’re real people living in real, complicated communities. I love that the museums and arts organizations we work with–really all our clients–want us to channel those people’s voices in our research. It’s a practice in empathy that’s built into the process…”

Cory Garfin

Project Director, Slover Linett

Latest Tweets

Caption this clip:
#audienceresearch

Twitter feed video.Caption this clip:
#audienceresearch
Ashley Ann Wolfe@AshleyAnnWolfe

Lots of exciting announcements coming soon from @SloverLinett!

cc:@cgarfin @vvp317 @jenbenoitbryan

2. Laughter isn't the opposite of seriousness; it's the most profound way to get serious about something. And it opens the doors wider.

"...giggle your way in. It's not the normal way to do it, but if you can, you bring a much bigger group."

Two deep lessons about public engagement from @rkrulwich, looking back on 15 years co-hosting @Radiolab:

1. What really draws people in isn't mostly the "content"; it's the human warmth and joy of the hosts. ("When two people are having real fun, it's sort of like a warm fire.")

Like I’ve been saying... Love what you’re stirring in the #classicalmusic pot, Aubrey. And I would add: human-centered research is a crucial element of the experimentation process - how we learn with (not just about) #audiences.

Twitter feed video.Like I’ve been saying... Love what you’re stirring in the #classicalmusic pot, Aubrey. And I would add: human-centered research is a crucial element of the experimentation process - how we learn with (not just about) #audiences.
Aubrey Bergauer@AubreyBergauer

I get asked all the time about what we can change in orchestra administration culture, and my answer is always the same.

Embrace experimentation.

If we focus too much on short term goals, we don't try new things, leaving bold ideas on the table that could deliver huge results.

#ICYMI: Check out this stunning sketch animation by @ATJCagan from last week's #AAASmtg session on millennial science engagement, featuring @jenbenoitbryan & @TheGeoffHunt.

cc: @PLinett @MeetAScientist @labxNAS

Twitter feed video.#ICYMI: Check out this stunning sketch animation by @ATJCagan from last week's #AAASmtg session on millennial science engagement, featuring @jenbenoitbryan & @TheGeoffHunt. 

cc: @PLinett @MeetAScientist @labxNAS
Alex Cagan@ATJCagan

In the interest of open data and methods sharing - here’s the whole process! Impressions from a session on communicating science to millennials #AAASmtg

Both quotes from the recent episode in which @JadAbumrad movingly interviews Robert on his retirement from the show: (My transcription, meant as tribute to Jad's tribute.)

And both points wholly in line with our research with #culture & #arts audiences.

The Bobbys | Radiolab | WNYC Studios

An award show you’ve never heard of before.

www.wnycstudios.org

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