A major American symphony orchestra created a new series designed to attract and engage new—especially young—audiences to its live programming. The series featured mixed-genre musical collaboration, an event-like atmosphere, and an array of features to bring a fresh, social energy to the event (such as food, drink, local bands playing in the lobby). The orchestra asked Slover Linett to design and conduct an audience research study to learn from and explore audience reactions to this experiment.  To identify the successes and opportunities of the series, we needed to understand how specific concert elements contributed to the overall experience, and whether there were any roadblocks along the way that might prevent attendees from positively relating to the experience—and the institution more broadly.  To do so, we designed a multi-step qualitative exploration in which we recruited non-attendees to attend a concert in this series and map their experience for us through interactive group conversations, focused on how they formed their impressions of the orchestra.  We also went out into the city on an ethnographic mission to explore the variety of energy and emotional connections emerging in live music interactions of all genres and venues—from avant garde performance art to improvisational jazz to small chamber ensembles.  Our research findings spanned the tactical to strategic, helping to inform both the refinement of this series as well as the marketing team’s positioning and communications for the series.  Ultimately, we helped the orchestra develop a deep understanding of the core audience for this series, their motivations, and the elements of the experience that they care most about. With time and cultivation, the institution hopes to extend this concert series into a platform for a long-term, ongoing relationship with new (especially younger) audiences.  The research has also inspired the staff to infuse more audience-centric elements into other concert formats and series.    

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A new report from @LaPlacaCohen and @SloverLinett sheds light on the major racial disparities of cultural audiences and the urgent need to be more responsive to its various communities, particularly during this time of crisis. http://ow.ly/aU7150Av3zi

“There’s a difference between proscenium performance and community action.”

I'm very grateful to have listened in on a conversation with @bamuthi, @KenCenPrez, and myriad artists and partners about this system of Social Impact just announced at @kencen. Details below: https://twitter.com/kencen/status/1281277745134256128

Twitter feed video.“There’s a difference between proscenium performance and community action.” 
 
I'm very grateful to have listened in on a conversation with @bamuthi, @KenCenPrez, and myriad artists and partners about this system of Social Impact just announced at @kencen. Details below: https://t.co/rONzLxYgyG
The Kennedy Center@kencen

"If racism is structural, then anti-racism also must be structural."—@bamuthi

Today, we announce a system of Social Impact that we commit to growing as your nation's cultural center.

Learn more about our eight areas of work ➡ http://bit.ly/KCSocialImpact

"Culture & Community in a Time of Crisis: A Special Edition of Culture Track" is a new study that aims to shed light on how arts and culture organizations can address the hopes, fears, and needs of Americans during and following the COVID-19 pandemic.

@steamworkgroup @LaPlacaCohen Happy to report that *now* the email requirement has been removed; thank you for your feedback and patience!

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