This museum is experimenting with new kinds of community collaborations that invite individuals and organizations to help bring temporary exhibitions to life through related programming—both insisde and outside of the museum. The museum’s evaluation and programming staff asked Slover Linett to conduct an evaluation of this emergent initiative to better understand the impacts of exhibition-based partnership programming and to inform its continued evolution. We conducted interviews both with internal stakeholders to the museum and with community partners involved in past collaborations to gain a holistic view of partnerships. And we facilitated a collaborative strategy development session at the museum, fueled by the research findings, with a cross-departmental team. We focused the museum’s attention on the fact that a lack of clear prioritization of the initiative’s many, and sometimes competing, goals resulted in staff who were working towards different definitions of success. These disparate visions of success affected partner organizations who received mixed (or missing) signals about the goals, duration, and intensity of the collaboration, resulting in some dissatisfaction when expectations weren’t aligned with reality. The strategy session helped the museum team play out scenarios of success as well as the implications of goal prioritization on partnership strategies, methods, and communications in the future. Photo credit: Craig Janson

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Ashley Ann Wolfe@AshleyAnnWolfe

Lots of exciting announcements coming soon from @SloverLinett!

cc:@cgarfin @vvp317 @jenbenoitbryan

2. Laughter isn't the opposite of seriousness; it's the most profound way to get serious about something. And it opens the doors wider.

"...giggle your way in. It's not the normal way to do it, but if you can, you bring a much bigger group."

Two deep lessons about public engagement from @rkrulwich, looking back on 15 years co-hosting @Radiolab:

1. What really draws people in isn't mostly the "content"; it's the human warmth and joy of the hosts. ("When two people are having real fun, it's sort of like a warm fire.")

Like I’ve been saying... Love what you’re stirring in the #classicalmusic pot, Aubrey. And I would add: human-centered research is a crucial element of the experimentation process - how we learn with (not just about) #audiences.

Twitter feed video.Like I’ve been saying... Love what you’re stirring in the #classicalmusic pot, Aubrey. And I would add: human-centered research is a crucial element of the experimentation process - how we learn with (not just about) #audiences.
Aubrey Bergauer@AubreyBergauer

I get asked all the time about what we can change in orchestra administration culture, and my answer is always the same.

Embrace experimentation.

If we focus too much on short term goals, we don't try new things, leaving bold ideas on the table that could deliver huge results.

#ICYMI: Check out this stunning sketch animation by @ATJCagan from last week's #AAASmtg session on millennial science engagement, featuring @jenbenoitbryan & @TheGeoffHunt.

cc: @PLinett @MeetAScientist @labxNAS

Twitter feed video.#ICYMI: Check out this stunning sketch animation by @ATJCagan from last week's #AAASmtg session on millennial science engagement, featuring @jenbenoitbryan & @TheGeoffHunt. 

cc: @PLinett @MeetAScientist @labxNAS
Alex Cagan@ATJCagan

In the interest of open data and methods sharing - here’s the whole process! Impressions from a session on communicating science to millennials #AAASmtg

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