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Jen Benoit-Bryan, PhD

Senior Researcher


Jen Benoit-Bryan designs, conducts, and interprets audience research studies, applying both quantitative and qualitative research methods to respond to client needs using tools such as statistical analysis of survey data, psychographic segmentation, focus groups, ethnographic observation, data mining, and staff trainings. Jen applies these research tools across a wide variety of Slover Linett’s clients including the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Carnegie Hall, and the American Repertory Theater, among many others.
 
Before joining Slover Linett, Jen was a researcher at the University of Illinois, where she conducted research for non-profit and government clients including the MacArthur Foundation, the Chicago Community Trust, and the Online Computer Library Center. She also ran a small consulting firm that specialized in providing research services to non-profit youth service organizations such as the National Runaway Safeline.
 
Jen earned a PhD in public administration with a focus on survey research from the University of Illinois in 2014. Jen’s doctoral dissertation analyzed the long term harms on adolescents of running away from home and the protective factors at the peer, school, and neighborhood levels that can reduce those harms. She has presented papers at national and international conferences such as the American Association for Public Opinion Research and published in leading journals such as Public Administration Review. Jen also has a Master’s degree in public administration from the University of Missouri, and Bachelor’s degrees in international business, marketing, and French from the University of Missouri.
 

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March 14, 2014 | Nicole Baltazar

Multiculturalism is key for creating inclusive arts experiences

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Last month, Coca-Cola aired its now-famous Super Bowl ad depicting people from various racial, ethnic, and cultural groups singing “America the Beautiful” together in different languages. Among the instant outpouring of polarized reactions to this ad rang much praise for its depiction of a multicultural America. Yet the ad provoked a slew of negative responses as well. Many of the ad’s detractors questioned whether this multicultural America could ever feel as cohesive as an America whose citizens speak a common language, and therefore have taken great strides toward assimilating into a common culture.

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